The University’s buildings are at the heart of the architectural heritage for which the city of Edinburgh is famous.

For those who have studied at the University and spent time moving among its buildings, both ancient and modern, the impact on the city’s environment and skyline is clear. Recent and planned major refurbishments, as well as investment in new construction projects, reflect the University’s ambitious approach to its estate as the needs of students and staff evolve. The photographs on these pages focus on the aesthetic richness of the Central Area campus, casting familiar locations in a new light and taking an unexpected perspective on more recent additions.

Architectural History Book

The University is working with Historic Scotland to produce a book showcasing the finest buildings across the University’s campuses, spanning its entire history. The book will include the stories behind the buildings and the people who use them. It is due to be published in 2016.

A sculpture on the Informatics Forum commemorates Jim Haynes’ Paperback Bookshop that once occupied the site, which was signposted by a rhino’s head.

A sculpture on the Informatics Forum commemorates Jim Haynes’ Paperback Bookshop that once occupied the site, which was signposted by a rhino’s head.

The Business School seen from 50 George Square, the new home of the School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures.

The Business School seen from 50 George Square, the new home of the School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures.

Part of the Chrystal Macmillan Building reflected in a window of 16 George Square.

Part of the Chrystal Macmillan Building reflected in a window of 16 George Square.

The Department for Social Responsibility and Sustainability at 9 Hope Park Square.

The Department for Social Responsibility and Sustainability at 9 Hope Park Square.

The Hugh Robson Building.

The Hugh Robson Building.

The David Hume Tower.

The David Hume Tower.

A stone balustrade in the Old College Quadrangle, part of a project completed in 2011 that transformed the square in line with plans dating to 1789.

A stone balustrade in the Old College Quadrangle, part of a project completed in 2011 that transformed the square in line with plans dating to 1789.

Stonework in the entrance to the Old Medical School, Teviot Place.

Stonework in the entrance to the Old Medical School, Teviot Place.

St Albert’s Catholic Chaplaincy in George Square won two 2013 Edinburgh Architectural Association Awards, including best use of wood in a building.

St Albert’s Catholic Chaplaincy in George Square won two 2013 Edinburgh Architectural Association Awards, including best use of wood in a building.

The former New North Free Church, which has been home to the student-run Bedlam Theatre since 1980.

The former New North Free Church, which has been home to the student-run Bedlam Theatre since 1980.

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